Fake news: Why we click it, how to stop, Aug. 15 — NEW DATE AND LOCATION!

Join us as we hear a panel of distinguished journalists discuss the issue that has both media people and the public talking and wondering about the future of our democracy.

This FREE program, “Fake News: Why We Click It, How to Stop” is 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 15, in the Community Room (L162/163) at the South Mountain Community Library, 7050 S. 24th St., Phoenix.

This discussion is presented by Valley of the Sun SPJ in partnership with the SMCL, a partnership between the Phoenix Public Library and South Mountain Community College. The library, which opened in 2011, is a beautiful copper, concrete and steel structure containing 50,000 square feet.

RSVP to our Facebook page!

Speakers:

 

Lauren Gilger, host/producer, KJZZ, Phoenix

 

 

Mary Jo Pitzl, state government reporter, Arizona Republic, Phoenix

 

 

 

Jessica Pucci, Ethics and Excellence Professor of Practice, Data Analysis and Audience Engagement, Arizona State University Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Phoenix

 

 

Allison Rodriguez, multimedia journalist and anchor, ABC15, Phoenix

 

 

Topics will include:

  • What do we mean whenmicrophone09.jpg 42.8K we say fake news?
  • Red flags to help you know if you are viewing fake news
  • How do be a more media-savvy news consumer
  • How our own news-consumption habits worsen the problem
  • Do fact checkers and “Pinocchio”-like ratings systems work?
  • How Facebook and others are trying to fix the problem
  • How mainstream news organizations can better engage wary audiences

For further information, contact chapter president Tim Eigo. Eigo, editor of Arizona Attorney magazine, will moderate the discussion.

UA libraries provide free resources, guide to spotting ‘fake news,’ telling if news sources are reliable

From the University of Arizona School of Journalism in a March 9 post on Facebook: “Need help in spotting ‘fake news’ and judging sources? Check out this new guide put together by Mary Feeney and University of Arizona Libraries.”

The UA libraries have created an online guide to spotting fake news, or hoax news. Several reliable, helpful resources for news consumers are provided, including a helpful 3 minute, 22 second video from FactCheck.org called “How to Spot Fake News.”

Here’s the information on the libraries’ website.