Fake news: Why we click it, how to stop, July 18 — POSTPONED

Image of Great Reading Room - Fifth Floor of Central Library

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SPJ POSTPONES JULY 18 “FAKE NEWS” EVENT DUE TO STORM DAMAGE THAT CLOSES PHOENIX BURTON BARR CENTRAL LIBRARY:

To those planning to attend our July 18 event, “Fake News: Why We Click It, How to Stop”: It has been postponed and a new date is being worked out. Saturday night’s monsoon storm “badly damaged” the Phoenix Burton Barr Central Library from water that streamed into the library from the roof, leading library officials to close the building indefinitely for cleanup and repair work. We thank you for your understanding and will post the new date and location on this site as soon as they have been determined.

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Join us as we hear a panel of distinguished journalists discuss the issue that has both media people and the public talking and wondering about the future of our democracy. Image of chairs and tables in front of a screen.

This FREE program, “Fake News: Why We Click It, How to Stop” is 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 18, in the Pulliam Auditorium at the Burton Barr Central Library, 1221 N. Central Ave., Phoenix. It is presented by Valley of the Sun SPJ in partnership with the Phoenix Public Library,

RSVP to our Facebook event page!

Speakers:

 

Lauren Gilger, host/producer, KJZZ, Phoenix

 

 

Mary Jo Pitzl, state government reporter, Arizona Republic, Phoenix

 

 

 

Jessica Pucci, Ethics and Excellence Professor of Practice, Data Analysis and Audience Engagement, Arizona State University Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Phoenix

 

 

Allison Rodriguez, multimedia journalist and anchor, ABC15, Phoenix

 

 

Topics will include:

  • What do we mean whenmicrophone09.jpg 42.8K we say fake news?
  • Red flags to help you know if you are viewing fake news
  • How do be a more media-savvy news consumer
  • How our own news-consumption habits worsen the problem
  • Do fact checkers and “Pinocchio”-like ratings systems work?
  • How Facebook and others are trying to fix the problem
  • How mainstream news organizations can better engage wary audiences

For further information, contact chapter president Tim Eigo.